History Simulations: Engaging Critical Thinking and Developing Multiple Perspectives from Other Cultures
Sunday, February 11, 2018 at 4:26PM
David Arendale in Culture, Curriculumn, History, Learning Pedagogy

I teach an introductory global history course for first-year undergraduates at the University of Minnesota.  I have been teaching introductory history courses for nearly four decades.  One of the learning activities that has most engaged the students are history simulations.  While I use a varied learning pedagogy, the most meaningful learning events for the students according to them are the simulations.  The students say that it is taking on the role of another country or group and engaging in highly-energized negotiations with two other groups leads to the following outcomes:  active learning like this is most meaningful, develop understanding of different perspectives of other countries and groups, and development of personal negotiation skills they will use in personal and future professional life. <Click here for the history simulation web page.>

Article originally appeared on David Arendale's Web Site: History Simultations, Peer Learning, Learning Technology, Academic Achievement, Postsecondary (http://www.arendale.org/).
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